7/30/15 Clinton’s Secret Emails

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All government correspondence must be saved. It’s federal law.  And it includes everything from handwritten notes to texts and emails.

It’s at the heart of Hillary Clinton’s email scandal.  

As Secretary of State, Clinton ignored the State Department system. Instead she used a secret email server stored in her New York home.  

[It was registered to a colleague of her husband.]

Clinton and several of her closest advisers conducted State Department business using secret email accounts.  There was no oversight.

[According to court documents, top aide and longtime confidante Huma Abedin has yet to turn-over any emails.  Another close aide, Phillip Reines, surprised officials when it was learned he held 20 boxes of email related to State Department affairs that was conducted on a personal email account.]

After the server was publicly revealed, Clinton deleted thousands of emails and wiped the server clean. Eventually she turned over less than half of the emails to the State Department.  Any evidence of wrongdoing may be lost forever.

[For example, there are unexplained prolonged gaps in email activity.]

Clinton’s unprotected server was vulnerable to hacking by foreign governments.  Not a problem, she claimed, since her emails didn’t contain classified information.  

A federal judge has ordered the State Department to release whatever it has of Clinton emails. It’s redacted portions and withheld others because, the agency says, some emails contain classified information.  A direct contradiction of Clinton’s claims.  Somebody’s not being truthful.

There’s been one important revelation gleaned from the released emails. They seem to contradict Clinton’s claim she had no role in developing the infamous Benghazi talking points. The Obama Administration falsely blamed an obscure You Tube video as the cause of the attack on the US consulate in Libya. In that attack, Jihadists killed the US ambassador and three others.

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